Mainframe, Youth and T-Shirt Driven Development

kathy t

If you don't know Kathy Sierra you should. She is one of America's foremost thinkers on the psychology of learning and how to get kick ass results in IT through her blog, Creating Passionate Users. One post that always sticks in my mind is T-Shirt First Development. In it Kathy points out:

Guy Kawasaki (the original Mac evangelist for Apple) said it in his 1992 book Selling the Dream: make the t-shirt before you make the product. If you're a team lead, project manager, open source evangelist... make the t-shirt. If you're promoting a business, service, supporting a cause... make the t-shirt. And the more subversive, the better. If the t-shirt is for internal use only, see how far you can push before marketing or legal steps in. The more maverick the shirt, the more valued it becomes.

Anyone would think IBM was listening. Subversive - check (the t-shirt in questions rips off Pink Floyd). Here is the video she is pointing to- the mainframe rejuvenation continues.

One thing is very very clear. Scott Wetter and Ben Ferancheck both have a bright future in IT, architecture and management.

by James Governor October 1, 2008
Permalink

TrackBack

TrackBack URL for this entry:
http://www.typepad.com/services/trackback/6a00d834521c8469e20105351a81f8970c

Listed below are links to weblogs that reference Mainframe, Youth and T-Shirt Driven Development:

Comments

I did the competition last year and have that shirt. I love it so much. It gets a lot of comment, and allows me to tell people about the current state of Mainframe administration (very tenuous, all the old mainframers are retiring) and the competition, itself.

I just finished Parts 1 and 2 of this year's competition, and I'm eagerly awaiting this year's cool shirt.

Posted by: Nathan | Oct 2, 2008 3:34:23 PM

Because IBM ripped off pink floyd it really helped their marketing; if you see a printed t shirt being worn around it is the best form of branding!

Posted by: Jared Fullinfaw | Apr 21, 2011 9:46:02 PM

The comments to this entry are closed.



The postings on this site are our own and don’t necessarily represent the positions, strategies or opinions of our employers.
© Copyright 2005 the respective authors of the Mainframe Weblog.