How Much Do Architects Need to Know About Mainframes?

David Stephens asks an interesting question and tries to answer it. I find a lot to agree with in his article — and I might also have a few quibbles. Example: z/OS (which I assume the author meant) is exactly UNIXTM. It is much more, too, of course.

There's a certain expectation that IT architects have superhuman talent, and I hesitate to pile onto the "architects need to know more to be competent" bandwagon too much. However, to expand on David's article a bit, I observe many IT architects struggling with cost and economic factors. Or, more strongly, I see many totally botching it, designing solutions with a weak grasp of true total costs. I have been fortunate to work with some smart people who understand IT cost patterns to an exceptional degree, and I have become a much better architect working with them. I would encourage other architects to seek out similar experiences.

by Timothy Sipples November 11, 2009 in People
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Mainframes run critical applications that the organisation simply cannot do without. They hold much of the 'core', or critical data, and process more transactions than most other platforms combined.Architects cannot properly contribute recommendations about whether processing should be removed from the mainframe without fully understanding that processing. And if the mainframe is to be retired, it makes sense for the architect to fully understand the soon-to-be replaced systems.

Posted by: micro sd | Dec 14, 2009 7:45:59 AM

IT companies need to focus on mobilization of Mainframe Architect profiles.

Posted by: Joydeep Banerjee | Apr 2, 2010 3:14:00 AM

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