Maybe It's Time for More Mainframe Solutions

Sony-executives-bow

Sony reports a huge data breach involving its PlayStation Network. At this writing, Sony has not been able to bring services back online, leaving millions of gamers (and Sony's coffers) poorer.

South Korea's NH Bank also went offline. Preliminary signs point to a sophisticated employee-mounted attack in that case, which wiped out both primary and disaster recovery resources concurrently. Nobody is sure which employee(s), though.

I hope we can all learn from these experiences and others, which unfortunately seem to be growing in frequency and severity.

UPDATE: South Korean investigators now think that North Korean experts were behind the devastating attack on Nonghyup Bank which wiped out many of the bank's credit card records and disabled the bank's core services for several days. Meanwhile, the Korea Internet Security Agency (KISA) reports that 82.7% of South Korean companies do not have any plan for recovery in the event of a disaster or attack. That includes numerous large South Korean businesses. Lack of any DR plan, at least a sub-standard one, would be unthinkable in many countries — and hopefully now unthinkable in Korea. (Photo: Sony executives bow. See the full story at The Australian.)

by Timothy Sipples April 26, 2011 in Business Continuity, Current Affairs, Games, Security
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More bad news for Sony today. It was announced that an additional 25 million or so accounts were hacked on top of the already announced 77 million last week. This is a disaster for Sony, perhaps and death nail for the PlayStation

Posted by: Zeiss conquest | May 3, 2011 3:07:13 AM

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