Friendly Application Development

One of the Big LiesTM told about mainframes is that you can't quickly and easily develop new applications using application development methodologies familiar to college students.

Rubbish. In fact, I can't think of a modern application development technology that isn't available for the IBM mainframe.

What does mainframe application development look like? Like...application development! Use what you like, my programmer friends. If terminal screens and line mode editors get you excited, jump for joy. If the Eclipse-based workbench is what you prefer, throw a party. Want to compile your program for Linux on z? Don't have a mainframe of your own yet? IBM has you covered, and it's free for the asking. No special skills required: just login (as root!) and go. Think programming itself is old fashioned? Then have a blast with the UML/business modeling/BPEL stuff.

The geek in me gets excited about pictures like this one. (Click on the picture if you want to get four times as excited.) Can you identify this screen?

Wdz_v7_c_1

by Timothy Sipples November 21, 2006
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Comments

Sure does look familiar! I just attended a SOA "Wildfire" class demonstrating Rational Application Developer, Websphere Developer for z, Message Broker V6, WebSphere ESB, CICS Web Services, etc. Focused on how to develop SOA applications for z/OS. Connect all the pretty dots! Drag and drop functionality. Can it get any simpler to service-enable legacy systems? :-)

Almost makes me want to pursue the Integration Architect position.

Bob

Posted by: Bob Richards | Nov 21, 2006 1:47:15 PM

Good quite new report about WDz by the Branham group is here: http://www.branhamgroup.com/article.php?cat=reports&id=49

Posted by: Harry Alton | Nov 22, 2006 5:19:53 PM

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